Do you think a lack of bathroom square footage means you have to forgo a luxury tub? Think again. This enviable bathroom from the_styling_edge features a deep soaking tub that's strategically placed to fit just perfectly inside the small nook. Though the space is heavy on patterns—with a bold tiled floor and a large art print—the simple black and white palette ensure it remains balanced.

On the other hand, if your home has one or more additional bathrooms that can fill in, and if you have moderate to advanced DIY skills, then there is no reason you can't take your time and do all or most of the work yourself. This route also has the advantage of giving you the time to find and buy all the materials for your bathroom, which can offer huge cost savings. 


Before starting to renovate a bathroom, consider to determine your budget. The cost of remodeling a bathroom depends on the size, started from small to medium or master. Not only the bathroom, but the fixture price also depends on its size. Moreover, the fixture elements that you will probably need while remodeling a bathroom are new shower or bath, countertops, lighting, flooring, and cabinets.

Adding wainscoting to your bathroom creates a more classic look and lends a bit of visual interest. For a more design-forward approach, invest in a graphic wallpaper, such as this tropical one seen on Design Sponge. By keeping the wainscoting white and neutral, the bold print adds a pop of personality without overwhelming the small space. The white pedestal sink not only uses less floor space than a large vanity but also blends in with the paneling to create an optical illusion of more space.


Follow Fig. B, for the new drain/vent plan. The new shower drain is vented separately into the main stack (Photos 10, 12 and 13). Most bathrooms have the main stack positioned directly behind the toilet. The wall-mounted toilet shown here cannot be positioned directly behind the stack because there’s not room for the necessary elbows. If your stack is more than 12 in. to the side of the existing toilet, you can keep the same location for the wall-hung toilet. But if it’s directly behind it, you’ll need to swap the sink and toilet locations like we did.
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Disconnect the trap from the tub, remove any clips, fasteners or screws that hold the tub to the wall, and demolish the old cast iron tub with a sledgehammer. Remove the sink and toilet. Turn off the electricity at the main panel and remove light fixtures. Cap the wires with wire connectors. Then rip out the wall finishes and surfaces clean down to the studs and pull out any insulation. If your ceiling is in good shape, use a utility knife to cut the drywall along the edges so the wall materials will separate cleanly from the ceiling.
Yes, with our affordable bathroom renovation packages, you can significantly reduce your costs by renovating more than one bathroom at a time. We have packages available for two bathroom renovations, three bathroom renovations, and above. If you choose to have two or more renovation projects completed by us, we will offer an exclusive discount that will help you get all bathrooms renovated at an affordable price.

This eclectic bath got a one-of-a-kind floor with a pebble-tile "rug" created with mesh-back river rock tile squares. Using just a few pieces of the more expensive pebble tile adds a luxe touch to the bathroom without adding much to the remodeling costs. The pebble tiles are the same color as the border tile, which creates an uninterrupted visual plane along the floor -- and helps the small bath feel larger.
The wall-hung toilet’s supply line must have a male adapter with a temporary galvanized cap. Check the instructions on the toilet to get the proper location. Routing water supply lines is different in every bathroom, so you’ll have to adapt runs to your situation. But run the plastic drain lines and vents before starting any supply work. It’s much easier to route water supply lines around drain lines than to route drains and vents around supply lines. The same thinking applies to electrical work: Wait until the water supply work is finished before wiring.
If your small bathroom is bursting with anything, let it be a personality (rather than stray makeup and toiletries). This girly, floral bathroom from At Home With Ashley uses a vintage-inspired wallpaper to add pops of color to an otherwise neutral white space. While wallpaper can be expensive, one benefit of a small space is that you won't need to purchase much in order to make a big statement.
Electrical rough-in. This is another task that should be left in the hands of pros unless you are one of the very few DIYers who are experts at it. A licensed electrician will run new circuits where required, install lighting and vent fans, and will arrange for the work to be inspected. Later, after the inspection is complete and the walls and ceilings are finished, the electrician will return to hook-up outlets, light fixtures, and fans. Two inspections are required: one at the rough-in phase, another after the final installation. 

Given the complexity of bathrooms—multiple components in a compact space, not to mention all that water—doing the project right is a challenge. (See Remodeling Dos and Don'ts.) On a cost-per-square-foot basis, bathrooms are one of the most expensive spaces to remodel. But that doesn’t mean you have to spend a fortune. That’s where Consumer Reports’ Bathroom Remodeling Guide comes in. Our product testers have spent months rating the latest toilets, sinks, countertops, and other bathroom essentials to separate the winners from the also-rans. We’ve also interviewed designers, contractors, and real estate pros nationwide to find out what to include—and what to skip—on your bathroom-remodel wish list.  

Wall and Floor Tile: Ceramic, porcelain and natural stone are popular picks for floor tile in bathrooms. Materials will be the deciding factor here, but natural stone often costs more to install because it is difficult to cut and place. From natural stone and classic ceramic to glass and mosaic styles that mimic natural materials, wall tile options vary.
On the other hand, if your home has one or more additional bathrooms that can fill in, and if you have moderate to advanced DIY skills, then there is no reason you can't take your time and do all or most of the work yourself. This route also has the advantage of giving you the time to find and buy all the materials for your bathroom, which can offer huge cost savings. 
Demolition. All remodeling jobs start with tearing out and removing elements that will be replaced. Depending on the level of your remodeling job, this can be a simple matter of removing old fixtures and flooring, or as complicated as removing everything down to the wall studs and floor joists. Either way, this can be hard work but it is not difficult, and most homeowners can do this work themselves to save money. Most demolition can be done in a weekend. You will need to rent a roll-off dumpster or arrange for a disposal company to take away a pile of demolition debris. 
Guest bathroom: This is a full-service bathroom, with sink, toilet, and shower or shower/tub combination, but one that is used sporadically when guests visit. In empty-nest homes, a kids' full bathroom might be converted to a guest bath. Because guest baths get only occasional use, many people choose to use economy fixtures and materials, which can greatly cut costs. And because this is a secondary bathroom, you can take your time remodeling it, which also saves cost. 
Yes, with our affordable bathroom renovation packages, you can significantly reduce your costs by renovating more than one bathroom at a time. We have packages available for two bathroom renovations, three bathroom renovations, and above. If you choose to have two or more renovation projects completed by us, we will offer an exclusive discount that will help you get all bathrooms renovated at an affordable price.
The special-order fixtures, fittings, shower pan, tile and glass block panel can take weeks to get in hand, so do the necessary legwork and ordering well in advance. Before gutting the bathroom, check to make sure that there are shutoffs for all the fixtures or a master shutoff for the entire bathroom. If not, buy ball valve shutoffs sized to fit your pipes. Then turn off the main water supply line where it comes into the house from outside, cut the pipes feeding the bathroom and install the new shutoffs right away (see Photo 7).
With just a few affordable changes, this powder room got an elegant new look. A slender pedestal sink adds a graceful shape to the room without taking up much space. The easy-to-clean wainscoting behind the sink adds a pretty architectural element in this small bath. Installing the painted beaded board just past the midpoint of the wall draws the eye up and lends a sense of height and a layer of charm.
Demolition. All remodeling jobs start with tearing out and removing elements that will be replaced. Depending on the level of your remodeling job, this can be a simple matter of removing old fixtures and flooring, or as complicated as removing everything down to the wall studs and floor joists. Either way, this can be hard work but it is not difficult, and most homeowners can do this work themselves to save money. Most demolition can be done in a weekend. You will need to rent a roll-off dumpster or arrange for a disposal company to take away a pile of demolition debris. 

A DIY bathroom makeover is not complete without new floor tiles. But before you start grinding away with the grouting, use a mason’s chalk line to mark reference lines perpendicular (at a 90-degree angle) to the wall with the longest continuous line. This will allow you to keep your tiles in a straight line, avoiding the dreaded crooked tiling job.
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