It's hard to believe this is the same bathroom! Light and airy with a pop of colour thanks to the wall art, this chic soaking tub leaves plenty of room for the standing shower and various knick knacks.

Related: 9 Major Mistakes to Avoid When Renovating Your Bathroom

The job of installing our wall-mounted fixtures was tougher than it had to be, thanks to poor and contradictory one-size-fits-all instructions, metric fittings and duplicate and missing mounting parts. Prevent hard-to-fix future problems by test-fitting the actual fixtures when roughing in framing, plumbing and blocking to make sure everything will work out. Then finish the walls. When test-fitting, simulate finished floor and wall surfaces to get the clearances right.
Yes, definitely. We recommend that you purchase appliances/tiles/fittings on your own so that you can choose products that perfectly suit your taste and needs. We will help you get in touch with trusted suppliers and will guide you through the correct size/type of products to buy but the ultimate choice will be yours. On the other hand, if you are looking for someone to take care of all the hassle of picking and choosing the best appliances and tiles, then we can do it all for you, too!
With the rough plumbing complete and the toilet chair carrier in position, finish the electrical and add blocks as needed to support the sink (Photo 15), towel bars, grab bars, etc. Then close up the walls. We recommend cement board for durable tile walls and floors, but other tile backers are available at tile shops. Here are key installation tips:
Planning. Both DIY and contractor remodeling jobs depend on good up-front planning in order to control costs and keep things speedy. Some of the key elements include drawing plans (essential if your remodel will involve layout changes to the bathroom), obtaining building permits, signing contracts with any pros you will use and scheduling their time, and sourcing and ordering materials. A general contractor will do most of this work for you (which is why he costs more), but to save money, you can do all the planning work yourself. 
With just a few affordable changes, this powder room got an elegant new look. A slender pedestal sink adds a graceful shape to the room without taking up much space. The easy-to-clean wainscoting behind the sink adds a pretty architectural element in this small bath. Installing the painted beaded board just past the midpoint of the wall draws the eye up and lends a sense of height and a layer of charm.

Adding wainscoting to your bathroom creates a more classic look and lends a bit of visual interest. For a more design-forward approach, invest in a graphic wallpaper, such as this tropical one seen on Design Sponge. By keeping the wainscoting white and neutral, the bold print adds a pop of personality without overwhelming the small space. The white pedestal sink not only uses less floor space than a large vanity but also blends in with the paneling to create an optical illusion of more space.

My experience with Bathroom Renovations Sydney was quite pleasant. The team of workers they sent over were very knowledgeable and professional and had everything planned out from the demolition to the finishing. Each subcontractor in their team was capable, courteous, and cooperative. The consistency in their work through the renovation and the quality of work that they delivered was simply exceptional. I am very delighted with the results and my bathroom looks as great as well. Thank you so much for all the hard work!
Drywall installation. Most remodeling jobs will involve opening up at least some of the walls and ceilings, and after the plumbing and wiring rough-ins have been inspected and passed, a drywall pro or DIYer can then install and finish the drywall. This is somewhat tedious work, but it is well within the skill level of most DIYers. The money-savings here are modest, though, because professional drywall installation is not pricey. 
The cheapest route of all also typically the one that takes the most time: doing all or most of the work yourself. A very (very) skilled DIYer with plenty of time and a group of willing friends and helpers may be able to finish a bathroom remodel nearly as fast as a general contractor, but very few homeowners fall into that category. And there is the issue of quality: good contractors will do the job professionally, while many DIY installations will be recognizable as the work of an amateur. 
You’ll spend $3,000 to $8,000 on the typical remodel. Anywhere from 40 to 65 percent of a bath upgrade cost comes from labor. However, doing any project yourself means no insurance and added fees if something goes wrong. Hire a professional for any work you’re not comfortable doing, such as the plumbing and electrical. Consider the pros and cons of DIY vs professional bathroom remodeling.
The special-order fixtures, fittings, shower pan, tile and glass block panel can take weeks to get in hand, so do the necessary legwork and ordering well in advance. Before gutting the bathroom, check to make sure that there are shutoffs for all the fixtures or a master shutoff for the entire bathroom. If not, buy ball valve shutoffs sized to fit your pipes. Then turn off the main water supply line where it comes into the house from outside, cut the pipes feeding the bathroom and install the new shutoffs right away (see Photo 7).
For the most part, that means moving the GFCIs (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters) and other power outlets so that they line up with your new vanity and cabinets. After all, you don’t want to have to reach down next to the toilet in order to plug in your hair dryer. You should call in an electrician for this step, especially if you have never worked with home wiring before.

If you dream of a standalone shower and a claw-foot tub, this cozy bathroom from Hometalk is the perfect inspiration for your next renovation. By replacing a standard shower curtain with a glass door panel, the bathroom feels more open. The frosted glass windows allow precious natural light in (a small space's favorite accessory), without sacrificing privacy.
To begin, rip the top and side jambs to the thickness of the wall framing plus the exterior wall sheathing. The cement board will lap over the jambs. The windowsill should also be flush with the interior framing, but hang over the outside sheathing about 1-1/2 in. and have a 5-degree slope toward the outside to help shed water. To keep water from running behind the siding as it drips off the edge, cut a shallow groove (or saw kerf) in the bottom lip (Fig. A). Also, remember to flash behind the trim to keep the window watertight. Trim the window exterior to match the house, using caulk to seal between the trim and siding.
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