How much should you spend on your master bathroom? A rule of thumb is that the total project—including materials and installation—should cost no more than 5 to 10 percent of your home’s value. The National Kitchen & Bath Association (NKBA) puts the national average at about $16,000. Another guide is Remodeling Magazine's Cost vs. Value report, which compares the average cost of various renovation projects with the value they retain at resale. In 2011-2012, mid-range bathroom remodels cost an average of $16,552 and recouped 62 percent, while upscale bathroom remodels cost an average of $52,249 and recouped 56 percent. Here’s how the NKBA breaks down the budget for a typical bathroom remodel:                               

One of the best aspects of modern, contemporary design is the seamless, clean lines that create an open and airy feel. This updated bathroom from OneKindesign feels much bigger than it actually is, in part because the eye is drawn to the crisp, straight lines of the vanity, which elongates the room and almost seem to push the walls out. Neutral colors such as white and unpainted wood are also great choices for small bathrooms.
This elegant bathroom from Sugar & Cloth features Midas-approved gold fixtures throughout the design. Not only does the gold give the bathroom a classic look, but by keeping the accessories uniform throughout the space, the room feels cohesive and meaningfully decorated. One of the best ways to make a small bathroom feel inviting is to smartly decorate every nook and cranny.
Once everything has been panned out, we provide you with a detailed quotation which lists all the service costs, materials required (including tiles and accessories) that are needed to renovate your bathroom. Please note that you may wish to use your own supplies and products but we can provide you with customized packages that have them included, as well.
Even the slightest of errors in bathroom renovations can be the cause of much misery and disappointment in the future. We understand this and therefore, allocate an expert team of renovators who are highly skilled at executing renovation jobs with utmost precision. We conduct a thorough planning and design phase before starting the renovation process so that everything is on point and perfect according to your specific requirements.
A DIY bathroom makeover is not complete without new floor tiles. But before you start grinding away with the grouting, use a mason’s chalk line to mark reference lines perpendicular (at a 90-degree angle) to the wall with the longest continuous line. This will allow you to keep your tiles in a straight line, avoiding the dreaded crooked tiling job.
Planning. Both DIY and contractor remodeling jobs depend on good up-front planning in order to control costs and keep things speedy. Some of the key elements include drawing plans (essential if your remodel will involve layout changes to the bathroom), obtaining building permits, signing contracts with any pros you will use and scheduling their time, and sourcing and ordering materials. A general contractor will do most of this work for you (which is why he costs more), but to save money, you can do all the planning work yourself. 
The special-order fixtures, fittings, shower pan, tile and glass block panel can take weeks to get in hand, so do the necessary legwork and ordering well in advance. Before gutting the bathroom, check to make sure that there are shutoffs for all the fixtures or a master shutoff for the entire bathroom. If not, buy ball valve shutoffs sized to fit your pipes. Then turn off the main water supply line where it comes into the house from outside, cut the pipes feeding the bathroom and install the new shutoffs right away (see Photo 7).

Nail the bottom plate to the floor and the top plate to the ceiling. Then mark the positions of the shower base, toilet and sink. Lay out and toenail the wall studs into position (Fig. B) and the top plate for the low wall. On the opposite end of the shower, frame a matching 35-in. wide wall (see Photo 14) 60-1/4 in. (or the length of your shower base plus 1/4 in.) away from the first wall.
Tile the walls first, then the floor. When tiling around the window, keep the tile about 1/8 in. away from the glass block. Tile the floor, starting by carefully snapping center lines to lay out border strips and field tile. Work from those lines to get evenly spaced tiles throughout the floor. Grout the walls and floors but caulk the inside corners between floors and walls and where walls meet.
Bathroom Renovations Sydney did a superb job from start to finish when I wanted to get my bathroom redesigned and reconstructed. I opted for their traditional bathroom renovations service and the price they quoted was incredible. Despite initial speculations, the entire remodeling was done perfectly and my bathroom looks absolutely exquisite now! I would definitely recommend their home improvement and designing services.
Tile and flooring. Ceramic tile can pose one of the more significant costs for a bathroom, both in terms of time and materials costs. Ceramic tile showers and floors are premium materials that many homeowners choose to leave to the pros for installation. Tile work can be difficult to get right for a DIYer, but the cost-saving rewards can substantial, as this is labor-intensive work. Other flooring options are considerably less expensive, as well as friendlier to DIY installation. Tile and flooring is one area where you can save money by doing your research and buying materials online or when product lines are being discontinued. 
A DIY bathroom makeover is not complete without new floor tiles. But before you start grinding away with the grouting, use a mason’s chalk line to mark reference lines perpendicular (at a 90-degree angle) to the wall with the longest continuous line. This will allow you to keep your tiles in a straight line, avoiding the dreaded crooked tiling job.
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