In an ingenious turn, an inexpensive nightstand was turned into a vanity. It's a sophisticated alternative to a stock vanity and offers the look of a higher-end model. The nightstand drawer is still functional and can be used to store small items. A large above-counter sink minimizes splashing, and the nightstand was treated with a lacquer finish to make it water-resistant.

This elegant bathroom from Sugar & Cloth features Midas-approved gold fixtures throughout the design. Not only does the gold give the bathroom a classic look, but by keeping the accessories uniform throughout the space, the room feels cohesive and meaningfully decorated. One of the best ways to make a small bathroom feel inviting is to smartly decorate every nook and cranny.


With a DIY mind-set, the owners of this small master bathroom created a personal sanctuary on a budget. This Asian butcher table, found at an antiques shop, was repurposed for the vanity. The table maintains its authenticity with a simple above-counter sink. A new mirror adds a modern touch, while a pebble-tile "rug" on the floor adds texture and a spa-like accent.
There is nothing better than getting into a hot shower at the end of a long day. My husband and I have been wanting to do some remodeling to our master bathroom and I would love to have any one of these designs. They look so functional for their size and I love the shower doors in some of these designs! These have given me some great ideas, thanks for sharing!
Bathroom remodels provide 60 to 70 percent resale returns as a home improvement project. However, this project isn’t cheap. It is essential to plan your remodeling ideas ahead of time. Then, hire a remodeling contractor for the job. Ask questions, set realistic expectations, get accurate cost estimates and budgeting from the start. Also spend time learning how to work with a bathroom contractor.
The special-order fixtures, fittings, shower pan, tile and glass block panel can take weeks to get in hand, so do the necessary legwork and ordering well in advance. Before gutting the bathroom, check to make sure that there are shutoffs for all the fixtures or a master shutoff for the entire bathroom. If not, buy ball valve shutoffs sized to fit your pipes. Then turn off the main water supply line where it comes into the house from outside, cut the pipes feeding the bathroom and install the new shutoffs right away (see Photo 7).
There are also contractors who are perfectly willing to split the work with energetic and skilled homeowners. You can, for example, offer to do all the demolition and painting/finishing work yourself, in exchange for a discounted bid from a general contractor. And if there are other tasks you are able and willing to take on, discuss this with your contractor. But make sure to discuss it upfront. Time is money for a general contractor, and he will not want his progress delayed while a homeowner dawdles over installing the ceramic tile floor, for example.
The job of installing our wall-mounted fixtures was tougher than it had to be, thanks to poor and contradictory one-size-fits-all instructions, metric fittings and duplicate and missing mounting parts. Prevent hard-to-fix future problems by test-fitting the actual fixtures when roughing in framing, plumbing and blocking to make sure everything will work out. Then finish the walls. When test-fitting, simulate finished floor and wall surfaces to get the clearances right.
There is no way around it: it costs more to remodel quickly than it does to take your time. This is primarily because a quick remodel really requires a general contractor (GC) to coordinate the project with various subcontractors (plumbers, electricians, tiling contractors), and you are paying for the general contractor's skill and experience. While it is possible for a homeowner to serve as his or her own general contractor—interviewing, hiring, supervising, and paying individual professionals to do their work in order—this is always a slower process than allowing a GC to coordinate his preferred subcontractors. Hiring your own subcontractors, though, can save you quite a bit of money, as you eliminate the time and overhead of the general contractor. 
The cheapest route of all also typically the one that takes the most time: doing all or most of the work yourself. A very (very) skilled DIYer with plenty of time and a group of willing friends and helpers may be able to finish a bathroom remodel nearly as fast as a general contractor, but very few homeowners fall into that category. And there is the issue of quality: good contractors will do the job professionally, while many DIY installations will be recognizable as the work of an amateur. 
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