Demolition. All remodeling jobs start with tearing out and removing elements that will be replaced. Depending on the level of your remodeling job, this can be a simple matter of removing old fixtures and flooring, or as complicated as removing everything down to the wall studs and floor joists. Either way, this can be hard work but it is not difficult, and most homeowners can do this work themselves to save money. Most demolition can be done in a weekend. You will need to rent a roll-off dumpster or arrange for a disposal company to take away a pile of demolition debris. 
Yes, all of our bathroom renovations projects are covered under a 7-year guarantee. We work with the best tradesmen and professionals in the industry to ensure that all work is done in compliance with the Australian building codes but at the same time, also provide guarantees for all work that we do. We are here to ensure the maximum satisfaction of our customers.
With a DIY mind-set, the owners of this small master bathroom created a personal sanctuary on a budget. This Asian butcher table, found at an antiques shop, was repurposed for the vanity. The table maintains its authenticity with a simple above-counter sink. A new mirror adds a modern touch, while a pebble-tile "rug" on the floor adds texture and a spa-like accent.

How much should you spend on your master bathroom? A rule of thumb is that the total project—including materials and installation—should cost no more than 5 to 10 percent of your home’s value. The National Kitchen & Bath Association (NKBA) puts the national average at about $16,000. Another guide is Remodeling Magazine's Cost vs. Value report, which compares the average cost of various renovation projects with the value they retain at resale. In 2011-2012, mid-range bathroom remodels cost an average of $16,552 and recouped 62 percent, while upscale bathroom remodels cost an average of $52,249 and recouped 56 percent. Here’s how the NKBA breaks down the budget for a typical bathroom remodel:                               
Tile and flooring. Ceramic tile can pose one of the more significant costs for a bathroom, both in terms of time and materials costs. Ceramic tile showers and floors are premium materials that many homeowners choose to leave to the pros for installation. Tile work can be difficult to get right for a DIYer, but the cost-saving rewards can substantial, as this is labor-intensive work. Other flooring options are considerably less expensive, as well as friendlier to DIY installation. Tile and flooring is one area where you can save money by doing your research and buying materials online or when product lines are being discontinued. 
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This eclectic bath got a one-of-a-kind floor with a pebble-tile "rug" created with mesh-back river rock tile squares. Using just a few pieces of the more expensive pebble tile adds a luxe touch to the bathroom without adding much to the remodeling costs. The pebble tiles are the same color as the border tile, which creates an uninterrupted visual plane along the floor -- and helps the small bath feel larger.
With the rough plumbing complete and the toilet chair carrier in position, finish the electrical and add blocks as needed to support the sink (Photo 15), towel bars, grab bars, etc. Then close up the walls. We recommend cement board for durable tile walls and floors, but other tile backers are available at tile shops. Here are key installation tips:
Tile the walls first, then the floor. When tiling around the window, keep the tile about 1/8 in. away from the glass block. Tile the floor, starting by carefully snapping center lines to lay out border strips and field tile. Work from those lines to get evenly spaced tiles throughout the floor. Grout the walls and floors but caulk the inside corners between floors and walls and where walls meet.
Plumbing rough-in. The plumbing work is one area where DIYers should be cautious, as the results of a bad installation can be catastrophic. Very skilled DIYers can do their own plumbing (and save lots of money), but most DIY remodelers hire pros for the plumbing work. The plumber may make several visits over the course of the remodeling job—one reason why this is one of the more expensive components of the project. Two inspections are required: one at the rough-in phase, another after the final installation. 
When vintage items filled the room, it’s neither modern nor traditional, but it called eclectic. An eclectic style does not quite fit some styles, such as modern, traditional, or retro. But it’s more like a combination of those styles with the addition of unique accessories. The eclectic designs in this bathroom are on the fixtures, vintage wallpaper, and a combination of white and black colors.
A luxurious Mediterranean style provides traditional interiors combined with the current one. Its casual and relaxing methods lead to a picture of the mediterranean sea. The furniture often painted in Mediterranean colors like yellow, bright blue, and rust. Dark wood cabinets and colorful tile ceramic floor makes this bathroom correctly shows the design.
A DIY bathroom makeover is not complete without new floor tiles. But before you start grinding away with the grouting, use a mason’s chalk line to mark reference lines perpendicular (at a 90-degree angle) to the wall with the longest continuous line. This will allow you to keep your tiles in a straight line, avoiding the dreaded crooked tiling job.
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