The choice of whether to do the work yourself or to hire pros (a general contractor or managing your own subcontractors) will, of course, depend on your assessment of your own skills, but also on your budget and your time schedule. If you have limited DIY skills and the small bathroom is the only bathroom you have, then getting the remodel done quickly and correctly is worth the extra cost of hiring pros—even if it means taking out a loan to do it. 
Full bathroom: This is any bathroom with a full range of amenities—toilet, vanity, sink, and tub/shower. It is a bathroom that is normally used every day. In homes with two or more full bathrooms, one full bath may be designated as the master bath, with others are dedicated to one or more children. Full bathrooms get lots of use, which has an impact on the fixtures and materials you choose for it. 

With a DIY mind-set, the owners of this small master bathroom created a personal sanctuary on a budget. This Asian butcher table, found at an antiques shop, was repurposed for the vanity. The table maintains its authenticity with a simple above-counter sink. A new mirror adds a modern touch, while a pebble-tile "rug" on the floor adds texture and a spa-like accent.
Most people think "small bathroom," and they think cramped shower stalls, dim lighting, and vanities stuffed to the gills. And while a small bathroom may mean making a few sacrifices on space, it can also be welcoming and comfortable. Plus, consider the major pros of a small bathroom. With less square footage to deal with, it's cheaper to renovate, faster to clean, and easier to decorate.

Interior bathroom demolition costs $1,000 to $2,300. Prices can go higher if you’re removing and moving walls to create a different footprint. For the experienced DIYer, this is a good place to save money by doing it yourself or assisting the contractor. However, demo can get expensive quickly if you take out a load bearing wall, cut electrical lines or break a water pipe. Avoid the risk by hiring a pro.
Mixing modern with antique is the secret to this bathroom's signature look. Both the vanity and sink/faucet combination are simplistic but foster vintage and contemporary aesthetics. This single-lever faucet is easy to use, and the tall spout is the perfect height to deliver water to the vessel sink. A nickel finish on all the fixtures creates a cohesive look in this master bath.
With it's black and white tiles and lavender walls, it looks like two bathrooms were squeezed into one. There was definitely a whole lot of clashing visions going on here.

Related: How to Refresh Your Bathroom for Less Than $100

For your remodeled bathroom to operate well, it’s critical to install vent and drain lines of the proper size and slope. Use a 2-in. line to drain the shower and 1-1/2-in. line to drain the sink. The vents for the sink and shower can be 1-1/2-in. pipes, but a toilet should be vented with at least 2-in. material. Make sure that the drain lines drop 1/4 in. for every foot of travel toward the main stack.
Nail the bottom plate to the floor and the top plate to the ceiling. Then mark the positions of the shower base, toilet and sink. Lay out and toenail the wall studs into position (Fig. B) and the top plate for the low wall. On the opposite end of the shower, frame a matching 35-in. wide wall (see Photo 14) 60-1/4 in. (or the length of your shower base plus 1/4 in.) away from the first wall.
If your room is wider than the shower base, fur in the walls as needed to butt against the ends of the shower base (see Photo 14). Our bathroom is 6 ft. wide, so we added a floor-to-ceiling 2×6 wall at the showerhead end and a shorter 2×6 wall at the opposite end. We made that wall only 43 in. above the floor so we could use the top of the wall to hold shampoo and other shower supplies. The shower base usually comes with a special 2-in. drain fitting that you connect to the drain line (Fig. B).
Master bathroom: This is a full-service bathroom that you use on a daily basis. In homes with two or more full bathrooms, the term "master" usually designates the one used by the home's owner on a daily basis. In homes with only one bathroom, that bathroom serves as the master bath, even if it is quite small. This is typically a fairly important room, one in which owners might spend a fair amount of money on quality, durable, and attractive fixtures and materials. 
Demolition. All remodeling jobs start with tearing out and removing elements that will be replaced. Depending on the level of your remodeling job, this can be a simple matter of removing old fixtures and flooring, or as complicated as removing everything down to the wall studs and floor joists. Either way, this can be hard work but it is not difficult, and most homeowners can do this work themselves to save money. Most demolition can be done in a weekend. You will need to rent a roll-off dumpster or arrange for a disposal company to take away a pile of demolition debris. 
These are some really great tips for anyone looking into remodeling or rejuvenating their bathroom. I have had the hardest time finding good storage options for my small downstairs bathroom, but that standing shelf unit actually looks really nice, I may have to try to find one like it. Thanks so much for writing, I’ll be referring back to this as I move along with my design.
Adding wainscoting to your bathroom creates a more classic look and lends a bit of visual interest. For a more design-forward approach, invest in a graphic wallpaper, such as this tropical one seen on Design Sponge. By keeping the wainscoting white and neutral, the bold print adds a pop of personality without overwhelming the small space. The white pedestal sink not only uses less floor space than a large vanity but also blends in with the paneling to create an optical illusion of more space.
Given the complexity of bathrooms—multiple components in a compact space, not to mention all that water—doing the project right is a challenge. (See Remodeling Dos and Don'ts.) On a cost-per-square-foot basis, bathrooms are one of the most expensive spaces to remodel. But that doesn’t mean you have to spend a fortune. That’s where Consumer Reports’ Bathroom Remodeling Guide comes in. Our product testers have spent months rating the latest toilets, sinks, countertops, and other bathroom essentials to separate the winners from the also-rans. We’ve also interviewed designers, contractors, and real estate pros nationwide to find out what to include—and what to skip—on your bathroom-remodel wish list.  
It's hard to believe this is the same bathroom! Light and airy with a pop of colour thanks to the wall art, this chic soaking tub leaves plenty of room for the standing shower and various knick knacks.

Related: 9 Major Mistakes to Avoid When Renovating Your Bathroom

Tile the walls first, then the floor. When tiling around the window, keep the tile about 1/8 in. away from the glass block. Tile the floor, starting by carefully snapping center lines to lay out border strips and field tile. Work from those lines to get evenly spaced tiles throughout the floor. Grout the walls and floors but caulk the inside corners between floors and walls and where walls meet.

The remodel preserved and enhanced the classic details while updating the functionality of the space. The blue floor tiles inspired the addition of sophisticated navy and-gray damask-print wallpaper, which the homeowners hung themselves. New beaded-board wainscoting painted bright white restored some of the room’s architectural detail and proved to be more cost-effective than taking the wallpaper to the floor.
Although this new bathroom is a bit smaller because of additional plumbing walls, it appears larger. Substituting a shower for the bathtub, adding a large mirror, and using a wall-hung sink and toilet all contribute to the spacious feeling. This big-picture stuff is striking, but it’s the step-by-step details that make this small bathroom remodel work. We cover the little kernels of information that will help your project go more smoothly and with fewer headaches.
Homeowners often imagine that remodeling a small bathroom—one that is about 50 square feet or less—will be much quicker, much easier, and much less expensive than remodeling a large bathroom. And they are often surprised to find that it's only a little bit quicker, a little bit easier, and a little bit less expensive. The reason? A small bathroom has most of the same elements as a large bathroom and remodeling requires assistance from the same in-demand professionals as does a large bathroom. The reality is that a 50 square foot bathroom may be one-third the size of a large 150-square-foot bath, but it typically costs about 75 percent of a large bath in terms of time, money, and effort.
A pedestal sink fits the home’s style but lacks storage, but a glass shelf and a new medicine cabinet stand in as handy storage. The homeowner suggests making sure the new cabinet will fit the existing hole before applying wallpaper in case the opening needs to be modified. Replacing the 1990s oak medicine cabinet with a white-framed version furthers the bathrooms lighter, bright aesthetic.
There are also contractors who are perfectly willing to split the work with energetic and skilled homeowners. You can, for example, offer to do all the demolition and painting/finishing work yourself, in exchange for a discounted bid from a general contractor. And if there are other tasks you are able and willing to take on, discuss this with your contractor. But make sure to discuss it upfront. Time is money for a general contractor, and he will not want his progress delayed while a homeowner dawdles over installing the ceramic tile floor, for example.
Although this bath was done on a budget, its small footprint didn't require much flooring material, which provided the homeowners an opportunity to splurge a bit. This woven mosaic tile is a perfect complement to the bathroom's style and will wear well. To stretch your budget, surround decorative tile with more affordable plain tile around the perimeter of the room.

The key to a weatherproof, attractive glass block window both inside and out is to encase it in a custom-built wooden frame (Fig. A) with inside dimensions that are 1/2 in. taller and wider than the panel itself. That will give you room to adjust and shim the panel exactly and then inject expanding foam between the frame and the panel to lock it into the opening (Photos 3 and 4).

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Renovating the laundry room from time to time can be a refreshing experience and if you are looking to get your laundry renovated then this service is just for you. With our laundry renovations services, we help your laundry blend in perfectly with your home and design it so that you can wash, fold, iron, hang, or store laundry comfortable and with a peace of mind.
Adding wainscoting to your bathroom creates a more classic look and lends a bit of visual interest. For a more design-forward approach, invest in a graphic wallpaper, such as this tropical one seen on Design Sponge. By keeping the wainscoting white and neutral, the bold print adds a pop of personality without overwhelming the small space. The white pedestal sink not only uses less floor space than a large vanity but also blends in with the paneling to create an optical illusion of more space.

There is no way around it: it costs more to remodel quickly than it does to take your time. This is primarily because a quick remodel really requires a general contractor (GC) to coordinate the project with various subcontractors (plumbers, electricians, tiling contractors), and you are paying for the general contractor's skill and experience. While it is possible for a homeowner to serve as his or her own general contractor—interviewing, hiring, supervising, and paying individual professionals to do their work in order—this is always a slower process than allowing a GC to coordinate his preferred subcontractors. Hiring your own subcontractors, though, can save you quite a bit of money, as you eliminate the time and overhead of the general contractor. 


Demolition. All remodeling jobs start with tearing out and removing elements that will be replaced. Depending on the level of your remodeling job, this can be a simple matter of removing old fixtures and flooring, or as complicated as removing everything down to the wall studs and floor joists. Either way, this can be hard work but it is not difficult, and most homeowners can do this work themselves to save money. Most demolition can be done in a weekend. You will need to rent a roll-off dumpster or arrange for a disposal company to take away a pile of demolition debris. 
Time to jump into your DIY pants. I am going to start off with the easiest and most prevalent DIY project around the house. Believe it or not, new paint can transform your bathroom from 1980s drab to 2010s fab. Whether you go bold with dark blue or casual with stripes, new paint will not only give new life to an outdated bathroom, but make it feel larger as well.
The wall behind the toilet can be almost any height. For a standard toilet height of 15 in., make the wall a minimum height of 43 in. If you’d like a higher toilet, make the wall that much higher. Or, make the wall go all the way to the ceiling. We built a short wall to conserve space and to create a shelf and a mirror alcove. The wall at the opposite end of the shower can be any height as well. We made it the same height as the toilet/sink wall so we could line up the accent tile and make a convenient shower shelf.
Tile and flooring. Ceramic tile can pose one of the more significant costs for a bathroom, both in terms of time and materials costs. Ceramic tile showers and floors are premium materials that many homeowners choose to leave to the pros for installation. Tile work can be difficult to get right for a DIYer, but the cost-saving rewards can substantial, as this is labor-intensive work. Other flooring options are considerably less expensive, as well as friendlier to DIY installation. Tile and flooring is one area where you can save money by doing your research and buying materials online or when product lines are being discontinued. 
Glass block comes in 8-in. and 6-in. squares and 4 x 8-in. half-block rectangles. You’ll need to choose between real mortar grout joints and clear silicone–joined blocks. We chose the silicone system because we liked the clean, uninterrupted look. Whichever way you go, buy the panel preassembled and banded together as one unit, ready to set into the opening.
When vintage items filled the room, it’s neither modern nor traditional, but it called eclectic. An eclectic style does not quite fit some styles, such as modern, traditional, or retro. But it’s more like a combination of those styles with the addition of unique accessories. The eclectic designs in this bathroom are on the fixtures, vintage wallpaper, and a combination of white and black colors.
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