Given the complexity of bathrooms—multiple components in a compact space, not to mention all that water—doing the project right is a challenge. (See Remodeling Dos and Don'ts.) On a cost-per-square-foot basis, bathrooms are one of the most expensive spaces to remodel. But that doesn’t mean you have to spend a fortune. That’s where Consumer Reports’ Bathroom Remodeling Guide comes in. Our product testers have spent months rating the latest toilets, sinks, countertops, and other bathroom essentials to separate the winners from the also-rans. We’ve also interviewed designers, contractors, and real estate pros nationwide to find out what to include—and what to skip—on your bathroom-remodel wish list.  
With a DIY mind-set, the owners of this small master bathroom created a personal sanctuary on a budget. This Asian butcher table, found at an antiques shop, was repurposed for the vanity. The table maintains its authenticity with a simple above-counter sink. A new mirror adds a modern touch, while a pebble-tile "rug" on the floor adds texture and a spa-like accent.
Toenail 2×6 blocks in the center of the shower 36 in. above the floor for the shower valve and 6 ft. 6 in. above the floor for the showerhead. Position the valve block so the plastic mud guard on the mixing valve will be flush with the finished wall surface. Attach the shower supply line and the hot and cold supply lines to the valve. Clamp the valve body and shower supply line to the blocks with copper pipe straps. Run copper water supplies to the new locations for the sink and toilet.

Do you think a lack of bathroom square footage means you have to forgo a luxury tub? Think again. This enviable bathroom from the_styling_edge features a deep soaking tub that's strategically placed to fit just perfectly inside the small nook. Though the space is heavy on patterns—with a bold tiled floor and a large art print—the simple black and white palette ensure it remains balanced.
With the rough plumbing complete and the toilet chair carrier in position, finish the electrical and add blocks as needed to support the sink (Photo 15), towel bars, grab bars, etc. Then close up the walls. We recommend cement board for durable tile walls and floors, but other tile backers are available at tile shops. Here are key installation tips:
With just a few affordable changes, this powder room got an elegant new look. A slender pedestal sink adds a graceful shape to the room without taking up much space. The easy-to-clean wainscoting behind the sink adds a pretty architectural element in this small bath. Installing the painted beaded board just past the midpoint of the wall draws the eye up and lends a sense of height and a layer of charm.

Fixture hookup. The final step is for the plumber and electrician to return to install the various fixtures and make the plumbing and wiring connections. There is an inherent hazard with any plumbing and wiring work, but when pros have run the plumbing and wiring inside the walls, the final hookups are well within the skill range of experienced DIYers. Make sure, though, that the final installation is inspected. 


Yes, definitely. We recommend that you purchase appliances/tiles/fittings on your own so that you can choose products that perfectly suit your taste and needs. We will help you get in touch with trusted suppliers and will guide you through the correct size/type of products to buy but the ultimate choice will be yours. On the other hand, if you are looking for someone to take care of all the hassle of picking and choosing the best appliances and tiles, then we can do it all for you, too!
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